Internet-Based and Classroom Training

Internet-Based Training

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2-day LNAPL Classroom Training

2014 class dates and locations:

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ITRC Training Program

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Upcoming Training Events (See 2014 schedule)

Internet-Based Training is hosted by ITRC and EPA at no cost to the participant. Classroom Training is free for state and some federal representatives. Private sector fees for Classroom Training are given on the Classroom Training page. Dates subject to change.

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All course times are Eastern Time. Dates subject to change.


Biofuels

ITRC offers 1 training course on Biofuels:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Biofuels: Release Prevention, Environmental Behavior, and Remediation

Biofuels and biofuel blends are a new category of transportation fuels and are defined as liquid fuels and blending components produced from renewable biomass feedstocks used as alternative or supplemental fuels for internal combustion engines. Their manufacture and consumption are increasing, in part, due to usage mandates and incentives both in the United States and abroad. This expanded use of biofuel and biofuel blends increases the potential frequency of releases due to the increased manufacture, transportation, storage, and distribution. Because biofuels differ from conventional fuels with respect to their physical, chemical, and biological properties, their introduction poses challenges with respect to understanding the potential impacts of releases to the environment. Specifically, once released into the environment, these fuels will exhibit different environmental behaviors as compared to conventional fuels.

This training, which is based on the ITRC’s Biofuels: Release Prevention, Environmental Behavior, and Remediation (Biofuels-1, 2011), focuses on the differences between biofuels and conventional fuels specific to release scenarios, environmental impacts, characterization, and remediation. The trainers will define the scope of the potential environmental challenges by introducing biofuel fundamentals, regulatory status, and future usage projections. Participants will learn how and when to use the ITRC biofuels guidance document for their projects. They will understand the differences in biofuel and petroleum behavior; become familiar with the biofuel supply chain, potential release scenarios, and release prevention; be able to develop an appropriate conceptual model for the investigation and remediation of biofuels and select appropriate investigation and remediation strategies; and be prepared to assess the behavior of new biofuels when alternatives come on the market.

Course Dates

  • March 20, 2014 (Thursday)
  • September 30, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Bioremediation

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Bioremediation:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in Groundwater

Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation (EISB) systems designed to remediate chlorinated solvents in groundwater involve input of an organic source, nutrients, electron acceptors, and/or microbial cultures to stimulate degradation. EISB systems may be used to remediate high concentration areas within plumes or source areas, to help provide containment of a chlorinated solvent plume, or as part of a treatment train down gradient from a primary cleanup or containment system.

This training is designed to introduce state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to the document created by the ITRC's In Situ Bioremediation Technical Team and the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF) Bioremediation Consortium titled, Technical & Regulatory Guidance for Enhanced In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater (ISB-6, 1998). The training focuses on a variety of amendments, which may be added to in situ bioremediation systems, the mechanism of delivery, and regulatory issues associated with approving or permitting EISB systems. This training includes discussion of common problems encountered during operation of a system.

Course Dates

Systematic Approach to In Situ Bioremediation in Groundwater: Nitrates, Carbon Tetrachloride & Perchlorate

Several aspects of in situ bioremediation (ISB) are characteristic of all sites, no matter what contaminant is being scrutinized. Many site characteristics used to determine the efficacy of ISB are also similar, even though contaminants and breakdown products differ. Once a site has been characterized for ISB efficacy and the contaminants of concern and degradation products have been defined, engineered approaches can be designed, pilot-tested, and possibly deployed.

This training presents a decision tree for reviewing, planning, evaluating, and approving in situ bioremediation (ISB) systems in the saturated subsurface. It defines site parameters and appropriate ranges of criteria necessary for characterization, testing, design, and monitoring of ISB technologies. The course is based on ITRC's Systematic Approach to In Situ Bioremediation: Nitrates, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Perchlorate (ISB-8, 2002), which describes information needed for any ISB evaluation, provides a flow diagram defining primary decision points, and discusses characteristics used to evaluate monitored natural attenuation or enhanced ISB application as remediation options. It includes examples of how to apply the document, with additional decision trees for nitrate, carbon tetrachloride, and perchlorate.

Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs)

ITRC offers 4 training courses on Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs):

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

DNAPLs Performance Assessment - Strategies for Monitoring the Performance of DNAPL Source Zone Remedies

The environmental problems associated with DNAPLs (dense, nonaqueous phase liquids) are well known: DNAPLs are extremely difficult to locate, small amounts contaminate large volumes, conventional groundwater extraction technologies do not work, and restoration of DNAPL sites to drinking water standards or maximum contaminant levels is considered unattainable. DNAPLs can be treated by implementing one of several or a combination of technologies. Despite the ever-increasing number of field applications of DNAPL removal technologies, many unanswered questions remain regarding the effectiveness of these technologies and how best to measure their performance with respect to site-specific remedial objectives.

This training addresses specific issues dealing with monitoring the performance of various DNAPL source zone remediation technologies. It is based on ITRC's Strategies for Monitoring the Performance of DNAPL Source Zone Remedies (DNAPLs-5, 2004). Performance is discussed in terms of effective and efficient progress toward the project goals. Elements of a robust performance monitoring program are described, including the need to establish appropriate performance goals and metrics well in advance. The applicability and limitations of various performance metrics, including the concept of mass flux, are discussed. Because of these limitations, a converging lines of evidence approach to performance assessment is stressed. While some issues pertaining to DNAPL fate and transport are covered in the document, participants are encouraged to review the material presented in the UK Environment Agency's Illustrated Handbook of DNAPL Fate and Transport in the Subsurface prior to taking the course.

In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Ethene - DNAPL Source Zones

Treatment of dissolved-phase chlorinated ethenes in groundwater using in situ bioremediation (ISB) is an established technology; however, its use for DNAPL source zones is an emerging application. This training course supports the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Ethene: DNAPL Source Zones (BioDNAPL-3, 2008). This document provides the regulatory community, stakeholders, and practitioners with the general steps practitioners and regulators can use to objectively assess, design, monitor, and optimize ISB treatment of DNAPL source zones. The objective is to provide adequate technology background for the user to understand the general and key aspects of ISB for treatment of chlorinated ethene DNAPL source zones. It is not intended to be a step-by-step instruction manual for remedial design, but describes technology-specific considerations for application of ISB of DNAPL source zones.

For this training and guidance document, a DNAPL source zone includes the zone that encompasses the entire subsurface volume in which DNAPL is present either at residual saturation or as “pools” that accumulate above confining units. The DNAPL source zone includes regions that have come into contact with DNAPL and may be storing contaminant mass as a result of diffusion of DNAPL into the soil matrix. Even though DNAPLs may be present in both the unsaturated and saturated zones, the discussion of ISB of DNAPL source zones in this training and guidance document focuses on treatment of DNAPL source zones within the saturated zone.

Two goals of any DNAPL source treatment technology are to 1) reduce the mass of contaminants within the source area and 2) prevent migration of contaminants above unacceptable levels. The enhanced ISB technology reduces source mass and controls flux through the enhanced dissolution and desorption of DNAPL constituents into the aqueous phase, and subsequent microbially mediated degradation processes. Although enhanced ISB of DNAPL source zones has been demonstrated in the field at a few chlorinated solvent sites, expectations for rapid depletion of the source zone must be realistic. This training and guidance provide detailed requirements necessary to support the realistic determination of goals for ISB of a DNAPL source zone.

To get the most out of this training, before the class, please review the associated document, the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Ethene: DNAPL Source Zones (BioDNAPL-3, 2008)

Integrated DNAPL Site Strategy

Sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents present a daunting environmental challenge, especially at sites with dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) still present. Restoring sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents to typical regulatory criteria (low parts-per-billion concentrations) within a generation (~20 years) has proven exceptionally difficult, although there have been successes. Site managers must recognize that complete restoration of many of these sites will require prolonged treatment and involve several remediation technologies. To make as much progress as possible requires a thorough understanding of the site, clear descriptions of achievable objectives, and use of more than one remedial technology. Making efficient progress will require an adaptive management approach, and may also require transitioning from one remedy to another as the optimum range of a technique is surpassed. Targeted monitoring should be used and re-evaluation should be done periodically.

This ITRC Integrated Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Site Strategy (IDSS-1, 2011) technical and regulatory guidance document will assist site managers in development of an integrated site remedial strategy. This course highlights five important features of an IDSS including:

  1. A conceptual site model (CSM) that is based on reliable characterization and an understanding of the subsurface conditions that control contaminant transport, reactivity, and distribution
  2. Remedial objectives and performance metrics that are clear, concise, and measureable
  3. Treatment technologies applied to optimize performance and take advantage of potential synergistic effects
  4. Monitoring based on interim and final cleanup objectives, the selected treatment technology and approach, and remedial performance goals
  5. Reevaluating the strategy repeatedly and even modifying the approach when objectives are not being met or when alternative methods offer similar or better outcomes at lower cost

This IDSS guidance and training is intended for regulators, remedial project managers, and remediation engineers responsible for sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Because the subject matter is complex, this guidance assumes a functional understanding of the field and is targeted towards experienced users; however, novices will benefit through descriptions and references of the latest evolution of site characterization challenges; realistic planning of site restoration; evolving treatment techniques; and evaluating, monitoring, and interpreting mass transport in the subsurface aqueous and vapor phases. While the primary focus of the document is on DNAPL sites, other types of contaminated sites (e.g., petroleum, mixed contaminants) can use the same fundamental process described in this guidance.

Course Dates

  • June 12, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • December 2, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Surfactant/Cosolvent Flushing of DNAPL Source Zones

Surfactant/cosolvent flushing involves the injection and subsequent extraction of chemicals to solubilize and/or mobilize dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The chemical flood and the solubilized or mobilized DNAPL are removed through extraction wells, and the liquids are either disposed or treated on site. This is a mature technology in the petroleum-engineering field, supported by decades of research and field tests.

Environmental applications have become more common in recent years. The technology has been shown effective for several DNAPL types, including spent degreasing solvents (TCE and TCA), dry cleaning solvents (PCE), heavy fuel oils, and coal tar/creosote. Lab work has demonstrated applicability to PCB-containing mineral oils. The primary appeal of the technology is its potential to quickly remove a large fraction of the total DNAPL mass. Technical challenges include locating and delineating the DNAPL source zone, estimating the initial DNAPL mass and spatial distribution, characterizing the hydraulic properties of the aquifer, delivering and distributing the injected chemicals to the targeted zone, and designing the optimum chemical formulation for a given DNAPL composition and soil type. Typical concerns include the cost of disposal of the effluent, regulatory permitting for underground injection of tracers or flushing agents, the overall impact of unremoved DNAPL, and the expertise of the personnel involved in site remediation.

This training familiarizes participants with ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Guidance for Surfactant/Cosolvent Flushing of DNAPL Source Zones (DNAPLs-3, 2003), which provides technical and regulatory information to help people understand, evaluate and make informed decisions regarding potential surfactant/cosolvent flushing projects. Included are a description of the technology, system operation, performance assessment, regulatory considerations, stakeholder concerns, case studies, and technical references.

Direct-Push Wells

ITRC offers 1 training course on Direct-Push Wells:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Direct-Push Wells: An Overview of Direct-Push Well Technology for Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring

Direct-push wells have been used for temporary groundwater monitoring purposes for many years but are generally prohibited for use as long-term groundwater monitoring wells. Recent research indicates that direct-push wells are as well suited for long-term environmental groundwater monitoring purposes as conventionally constructed wells. Since they can be installed for much less expense, direct-push wells are an attractive option. However, most states' regulations prohibit their use indirectly due to the requirement of a minimum annular space.

This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to The Use of Direct Push Well Technology for Long-term Environmental Monitoring in Groundwater Investigations (SCM-2, 2006), created by ITRC's Sampling, Characterization, and Monitoring Team to assist reviewers in assessing the adequacy of direct-push well projects. This course gives the participant a background in the principles of direct-push wells and presents the state of the art regarding recent research.

Ecological Land Reuse

ITRC offers 1 training course on Ecological Land Reuse:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Ecological Reuse - Planning and Promoting Ecological Land Reuse of Remediated Sites

The design and construction of the ecological end-use as an integrated component of the remediation system will realize pronounced benefits. Ecological elements considered at the inception of planning for environmental remediation at Superfund, RCRA, and Brownfield sites can be a cost-effective and an efficient way to restore, create, and improve wildlife habitat or the ecological system of the site. Incorporation of ecological elements can benefit multiple stakeholders, such as regulatory agencies, the regulated community (industry), local communities, and the general public.

This training is based on the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance: Planning and Promoting Ecological Land Reuse of Remediated Sites (ECO-2, 2006). The document presents a process to promote ecological land re-use activities considering natural or green technologies instead of more traditional remedies. The guidance demonstrates that natural or ecological end-uses are valuable alternatives to conventional property development or redevelopment. It contains the principal decision points in a flow diagram format and discusses the practicality of applying natural or green technologies to traditional remediation processes.

Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics

ITRC offers 1 training course on Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Enhanced Attenuation of Chlorinated Organics: A Site Management Tool

Many sites with chlorinated organic contamination in groundwater have gone through extensive remedial evaluations and actions. After years of operating high energy processes, their effectiveness has begun to diminish without remedial objectives being met. Other effective remedial alternatives can be applied; however, there are difficulties transitioning these sites from these high energy systems to other low energy remedial alternatives and eventually to Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA).

This training on the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance for Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics (EACO-1, 2008) describes the transition (the bridge) between aggressive remedial actions and MNA and vice versa. Enhanced attenuation (EA) is the application of technologies that minimize energy input and are sustainable in order to reduce contaminant loading and/or increase the attenuation capacity of a contaminated plume to progress sites towards established remedial objectives. Contaminant loading and attenuation capacity are fundamental to sound decisions for remediation of groundwater contamination. This training explains how a decision framework which, when followed, allows for a smooth transition between more aggressive remedial technologies to sustainable remedial alternatives and eventually to Monitored Natural Attenuation. This training will demonstrate how this decision framework allows regulators and practitioners to integrate Enhanced Attenuation into the remedial decision process.

As our experience and knowledge grows around the implementation of MNA, the EA process will be considered an important management tool for optimizing site remedies and moving sites to final completion. This approach is consistent with the current regulatory environment and can be accommodated within a broad range of regulatory programs such as CERCLA and state dry cleaner regulations. This new framework and decision process will accelerate the environmental clean-up progress on a national scale and reduce overall costs, while still providing protection to human health and the environment.

For reference during the training class, participants should download and print a copy of the decision flow chart, Figure 2-1 on page 10 of the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance for Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics (EACO-1, 2008) and available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/eaco/ITRC-EACO-DecisionFlowchart.pdf.

Environmental Molecular Diagnostics

ITRC offers 1 training course on Environmental Molecular Diagnostics:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Environmental Molecular Diagnostics: New Tools for Better Decisions

Environmental molecular diagnostics (EMDs) are a group of advanced and emerging analytical techniques used to analyze biological and chemical characteristics of environmental samples. Conventional data (e.g., hydrogeological data, chemical, and geochemical analyses) often provide only indirect data regarding the mechanisms and rates of key attenuation or treatment processes. EMDs can complement these data by providing direct measurements of the organisms, genes or enzymes involved in contaminant biodegradation, of the relative contributions of abiotic and biotic processes, and of the relative rates of various degradation processes. The information provided by EMDs can improve estimates of attenuation rates and capacities and improve remedy performance assessments and optimization efforts. Improved understanding of the biological and non-biological degradation processes also can lead to greater confidence in MNA or closure decisions. EMDs have application in each phase of environmental site management (including site characterization, remediation, monitoring, and closure activities), address a wide variety of contaminants (including PCE, PCBs, radionuclides, perchlorate, fuels), and work with various media (including groundwater, soil, sediments, soil vapor).

Although EMDs have been used over the past 25 years in various scientific fields, particularly medical research and diagnostic fields, their application to environmental remediation management is relatively new and rapidly developing. The ITRC Environmental Molecular Diagnostics Fact Sheets (EMD-1, 2011), ITRC Environmental Molecular Diagnostics Technical and Regulatory Guidance (EMD-2, 2013) and this companion Internet-based training will foster the appropriate uses of EMDs and help regulators, consultants, site owners, and other stakeholders to better understand a site and to make decisions based on the results of EMD analyses. At the conclusion of the training, learners will be able to determine when and how to use the ITRC Environmental Molecular Diagnostics Technical and Regulatory Guidance (EMD-2, 2013); define when EMDs can cost-effectively augment traditional remediation data sets; and describe the utility of various types of EMDs during remediation activities.

Training participants are encouraged to review the ITRC EMD Fact Sheets, in particular the Introduction to EMDs fact sheet, before the Internet-based training.

Course Dates

  • January 7, 2014 (Tuesday)
  • April 17, 2014 (Thursday)
  • September 25, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Green and Sustainable Remediation

ITRC offers 1 training course on Green and Sustainable Remediation:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Green and Sustainable Remediation

The ultimate goal of remediation systems is to protect human health and the environment from contaminants. Historically, remedies have been implemented without consideration of green or sustainable concepts in order to meet this goal. This includes the potential for transferring impacts to other media. For instance, many remedial decisions do not assess greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy usage, or community engagement factors prior to the investigation or remedy implementation. Considering these factors throughout the investigation and remedy implementation process may lessen negative effects of the overall cleanup impact while the remediation remains protective of human health and the environment. The consideration of these factors is Green and Sustainable Remediation (GSR) - the site-specific employment of products, processes, technologies, and procedures that mitigate contaminant risk to receptors while making decisions that are cognizant of balancing community goals, economic impacts, and net environmental effects.

Many state and federal agencies are just beginning to assess and apply green and sustainable remediation into their regulatory programs. This training provides background on GSR concepts, a scalable and flexible framework and metrics, tools and resources to conduct GSR evaluations on remedial projects. The training is based on the ITRC's Technical & Regulatory Guidance Document: Green and Sustainable Remediation, A Practical Framework (GSR-2, 2011) as well as ITRC's Overview Document, Green and Sustainable Remediation: State of the Science and Practice (GSR-1, 2011).

Beyond basic GSR principles and definitions, participants will learn the potential benefits of incorporating GSR into their projects; when and how to incorporate GSR within a project's life cycle; and how to perform a GSR evaluation using appropriate tools. In addition, a variety of case studies will demonstrate the application of GSR and the results. The training course provides an important primer for both organizations initiating GSR programs as well as those organizations seeking to incorporate GSR considerations into existing regulatory guidance.

Course Dates

  • February 20, 2014 (Thursday)
  • June 17, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • October 2, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance

ITRC offers 1 training course on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Groundwater Statistics for Environmental Project Managers

Statistical techniques may be used throughout the process of cleaning up contaminated groundwater. It is challenging for practitioners, who are not experts in statistics, to interpret and use statistical techniques. ITRC developed the Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013, http://www.itrcweb.org/gsmc-1/) and this associated training specifically for environmental project managers who review or use statistical calculations for reports, who make recommendations or decisions based on statistics, or who need to demonstrate compliance for groundwater projects. The training class will encourage and support project managers and others who are not statisticians to:

ITRC's Technical and Regulatory Web-based Guidance on Groundwater Statistics and Monitoring Compliance (GSMC-1, 2013) and this associated training bring clarity to the planning, implementation, and communication of groundwater statistical methods and should lead to greater confidence and transparency in the use of groundwater statistics for site management.

Course Dates

  • February 27, 2014 (Thursday)
  • April 22, 2014 (Tuesday)
  • October 7, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • December 16, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM)

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM):

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Soil Sampling and Decision Making Using Incremental Sampling Methodology - Part 1

When sampling soil at potentially contaminated sites, the goal is collecting representative samples which will lead to quality decisions. Unfortunately traditional soil sampling methods do not always provide accurate, reproducible, and defensible data. Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) can help with this soil sampling challenge. ISM is a structured composite sampling and processing protocol that reduces data variability and provides a reasonable estimate of a chemical's mean concentration for the volume of soil being sampled. The three key components of ISM are systematic planning, field sample collection, and laboratory processing and analysis. The adequacy of ISM sample support (sample mass) reduces sampling and laboratory errors, and the ISM strategy improves the reliability and defensibility of sampling data by reducing data variability.

ISM provides representative samples of specific soil volumes defined as Decision Units. An ISM replicate sample is established by collecting numerous increments of soil (typically 30 to 100 increments) that are combined, processed, and subsampled according to specific protocols. ISM is increasingly being used for sampling soils at hazardous waste sites and on suspected contaminated lands. Proponents have found that the coverage afforded by collecting many increments, together with disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, yields consistent and reproducible results that in most instances have been preferable to the results obtained by more traditional (e.g., discrete) sampling approaches.

This 2-part training course along with ITRC's web-based Incremental Sampling Methodology Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document (ISM-1, 2012) is intended to instruct regulators and practitioners on the fundamental concepts of soil/contaminant heterogeneity, representative sampling, sampling/laboratory error, and how ISM addresses these concepts. Through this training course you should learn:

  • Basic principles to improve soil sampling results
  • Systematic planning steps important to ISM
  • How to determine ISM Decision Units (DU)
  • The answers to common questions about ISM sampling design and data analysis
  • Methods to collect and analyze ISM soil samples
  • The impact of laboratory processing on soil samples
  • How to evaluate ISM data and make decisions

In addition, this ISM training and guidance provides insight on when and how to apply ISM at a contaminated site, and it will aid in developing or reviewing project documents incorporating ISM (e.g., work plans, sampling plans, reports). You will also be provided with links to additional resources related to ISM.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are state and federal regulators, project managers, and consultant personnel responsible for and/or directly involved in developing, identifying, or applying soil and sediment sampling approaches and establishing sampling objectives and methods.

Recommended Reading: We encourage participants to review the ITRC ISM document, http://www.itrcweb.org/ISM-1/, prior to participating in the training classes.  If your time is limited for reviewing the complete document in advance, we suggest, at a minimum, reading the Executive Summary, Chapter 4 - “Statistical Sampling Designs for ISM,” and Chapter 7 - “Making Decisions Using ISM Data” to maximize your learning experience during the training classes.

Course Dates

  • February 11, 2014 (Tuesday)
  • May 13, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME Click here to Register
  • September 9, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • November 4, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Soil Sampling and Decision Making Using Incremental Sampling Methodology - Part 2

When sampling soil at potentially contaminated sites, the goal is collecting representative samples which will lead to quality decisions. Unfortunately traditional soil sampling methods do not always provide accurate, reproducible, and defensible data. Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) can help with this soil sampling challenge. ISM is a structured composite sampling and processing protocol that reduces data variability and provides a reasonable estimate of a chemical's mean concentration for the volume of soil being sampled. The three key components of ISM are systematic planning, field sample collection, and laboratory processing and analysis. The adequacy of ISM sample support (sample mass) reduces sampling and laboratory errors, and the ISM strategy improves the reliability and defensibility of sampling data by reducing data variability.

ISM provides representative samples of specific soil volumes defined as Decision Units. An ISM replicate sample is established by collecting numerous increments of soil (typically 30 to 100 increments) that are combined, processed, and subsampled according to specific protocols. ISM is increasingly being used for sampling soils at hazardous waste sites and on suspected contaminated lands. Proponents have found that the coverage afforded by collecting many increments, together with disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, yields consistent and reproducible results that in most instances have been preferable to the results obtained by more traditional (e.g., discrete) sampling approaches.

This 2-part training course along with ITRC's web-based Incremental Sampling Methodology Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document (ISM-1, 2012) is intended to instruct regulators and practitioners on the fundamental concepts of soil/contaminant heterogeneity, representative sampling, sampling/laboratory error, and how ISM addresses these concepts. Through this training course you should learn:

  • Basic principles to improve soil sampling results
  • Systematic planning steps important to ISM
  • How to determine ISM Decision Units (DU)
  • The answers to common questions about ISM sampling design and data analysis
  • Methods to collect and analyze ISM soil samples
  • The impact of laboratory processing on soil samples
  • How to evaluate ISM data and make decisions

In addition, this ISM training and guidance provides insight on when and how to apply ISM at a contaminated site, and it will aid in developing or reviewing project documents incorporating ISM (e.g., work plans, sampling plans, reports). You will also be provided with links to additional resources related to ISM.

The intended users of this guidance and training course are state and federal regulators, project managers, and consultant personnel responsible for and/or directly involved in developing, identifying, or applying soil and sediment sampling approaches and establishing sampling objectives and methods.

Recommended Reading: We encourage participants to review the ITRC ISM document, http://www.itrcweb.org/ISM-1/, prior to participating in the training classes.  If your time is limited for reviewing the complete document in advance, we suggest, at a minimum, reading the Executive Summary, Chapter 4 - “Statistical Sampling Designs for ISM,” and Chapter 7 - “Making Decisions Using ISM Data” to maximize your learning experience during the training classes.

Course Dates

  • February 18, 2014 (Tuesday)
  • May 15, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME Click here to Register
  • September 16, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • November 6, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

In Situ Chemical Oxidation

ITRC offers 1 training course on In Situ Chemical Oxidation:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

In Situ Chemical Oxidation - What's New With In Situ Chemical Oxidation?

In the United States, an estimated 200,000+ remediation sites potentially threaten groundwater resources. When conventional treatment methods (e.g., pump and treat technology) are costly and inefficient, emerging in situ groundwater and subsurface soil treatment technologies may provide effective, lower-cost alternatives. The remediation of groundwater contamination using in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) involves injecting oxidants and potentially coamendments directly into the source zone and downgradient plume. The oxidant chemicals react with the contaminants, producing substances such as carbon dioxide, water, and in the case of chlorinated compounds, inorganic chloride. This course provides information to help understand, evaluate, and make informed decisions on ISCO proposals. The primary oxidants addressed in this training are hydrogen peroxide, potassium and sodium permanganate, sodium persulfate, and ozone.

This training presents updated guidance and technology advancement information for in situ chemical oxidation. Topics include a regulatory discussion related to ISCO implementation; details on the chemistry behind ISCO technology; considerations for system design and application, including health and safety; and performance evaluation information. The course is based on the ITRC's In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater, 2nd Edition (ISCO-2, 2005), with sections on technology overview and applicability, remedial investigations, safety concerns, regulatory concerns, injection design, monitoring, stakeholder concerns, and case studies.

Landfill Technologies

ITRC offers 3 training courses on Landfill Technologies:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Characterization, Design, Construction, and Monitoring of Bioreactor Landfills

Bioreactors are landfills where controlled addition of non-hazardous liquid wastes, sludges, or water accelerates the decomposition of waste and landfill gas generation. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, there are approximately 2,500 permitted municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) currently in operation in the United States. Approximately 10% of these facilities will involve retrofitting bioreactors and commence leachate recirculation on existing landfill infrastructures. Current trends indicate that 10-15 new landfills are being constructed each year, with 2-4 facilities being constructed as bioreactors.

The bioreactor process enhances gas generation that can provide a revenue stream and decrease the contaminant load in the leachate. Both of these activities reduce the potential risks associated with the landfill while increasing its long-term stability. When evaluating the bioreactor landfill concept, three additional advantages can be identified:

  • Decomposition and biological stabilization of the waste in a bioreactor landfill can occur in a much shorter time frame than occurs in a traditional "dry tomb" landfill
  • Bioreactors reduced leachate handling costs
  • Accelerated waste stabilization reduces the amount of post-closure care that may be necessary for the facility

This training, based on the ITRC Characterization, Design, Construction, and Monitoring of Bioreactor Landfills (ALT-3, 2006), teaches the principles used to make critical decisions faced by regulatory agencies, consultants, and industry during permitting, operating, and monitoring a bioreactor landfill. This training also provides a general understanding of the biological degradation of solid wastes under aerobic and anaerobic waste conditions and the degradation products associated with each process.

Course Dates

Design, Installation, and Monitoring of Alternative Final Landfill Covers

Solid and hazardous waste landfills are required by federal, state, and/or local regulations to cover waste materials prior to or as part of final closure. The ITRC Alternative Landfill Technologies team believes that the solid and hazardous waste regulations clearly provide a mechanism to permit, design, construct, and maintain landfills with alternative cover design. Several primary types of alternative landfill covers have been proposed for solid, hazardous, and mixed waste landfills; however, the design is in the science and engineering and should not be categorized or prescriptive. Alternative covers have been constructed and are fully operational at industrial waste, construction debris, municipal solid waste, and hazardous waste landfills. Alternative final covers (AFCs) may be used on bioreactor, conventional, or other types of landfills. Types of AFCs may include, but are not limited to, asphalt covers, concrete covers, capillary barrier covers, and evapotranspiration (ET) covers.

This training and associated guidance focus on ET covers and the decisions associated with their successful design, construction, and long-term care. ITRC developed the guidance document Technical and Regulatory Guidance for Design, Installation and Monitoring of Alternative Final Landfill Covers (ALT-2, 2003) and this associated training course to provide tools and resources when considering the application of alternative final landfill covers. The ITRC guidance and training course focus on a class of landfill final covers ('alternative' covers) as integral parts of an overall landfill system that differ in both design and operational theory from those designs prescribed in RCRA regulations.

Course Dates

Evaluating, Optimizing, or Ending Post-Closure Care at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

Since 1988, more than 6,100 municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have closed (see www.epa.gov/msw/pubs/mswchar05.pdf). Determining when the regulatory post-closure care (PCC) period can be ended for a permitted solid waste disposal facility is one of the greatest challenges facing the solid waste industry in recent times. Using a performance-based process, conducted on a site-specific basis, to determine if a closed landfill poses a threat to human health and the environment provides information necessary to defensibly conclude that the closed landfill does not pose a threat and allows termination of the regulatory post-closure care period.

This training, based on ITRC'sTechnical and Regulatory Guidance:Evaluating, Optimizing, or Ending Post-Closure Care at Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Based on Site-Specific Data Evaluations (ALT-4, 2006), describes a method to evaluate the performance of Post Closure Care (PCC) at a landfill and determine when leachate recovery, landfill gas management, groundwater monitoring and cap maintenance can be reduced or even ended based on threats (to human health and the environment) posed by the closed landfill. The training and document describe "custodial care" as those requirements the property owner must follow after PCC has ended. They include de minimus site management and care activities including meeting end-use obligations, maintaining institutional control, controlling access, satisfying local ordinances, and fulfilling other applicable regulations and are included as deed restrictions or other enforceable means which follow all land transfers. The training and document focus on PCC of municipal solid waste landfills. However, PCC is relevant to closed sites and facilities managed in accordance with a variety of regulatory programs including RCRA, CERCLA, Solid Waste, Brownfields, Voluntary Cleanup, mined land reclamation, and others. Solid waste professionals and other landfill decision makers (e.g., owners; operators; consultants; Federal, state, and local government; and the public) should attend this training.

Course Dates

Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs)

Light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) are organic liquids such as gasoline, diesel, and other petroleum hydrocarbon products that are immiscible with water and less dense than water. Understanding LNAPLs is important because they are present in the subsurface at thousands of remediation sites across the country, and are often the sole reason why a site remains “open.” The spectrum of sites where LNAPL assessment and remediation efforts may take place include petroleum manufacturing and handling facilities such as refineries, bulk product terminals, gas stations, airports, and military bases. LNAPLs in the subsurface can be a complex problem to address and can frequently prevent or delay regulatory closure (no further action) of remediation projects.

This training course is relevant for all levels of state and federal regulators, environmental consultants, and technically-inclined site owners and public stakeholders.

ITRC offers 4 training courses on Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs):

Classroom Training

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Light Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids: Science, Management, and Technology

classroom training photoITRC’s nationwide training courses are unique forums for the exchange of technical and regulatory information related to environmental remediation. Classroom training courses are offered in classroom settings where participants can receive in-person, face-to-face training. ITRC's multi-day classroom training events include hands-on problem solving to engage the students with real world and site applications. Multi-day classroom training is often provided in conjunction with an ITRC member state.

The Training Frequently Asked Questions page provides answers to common questions.

 
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April 1-2, 2014 in Kansas City, MO
This class was hosted by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality and Kansas Department of Health and Environment in partnership with the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC)
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More information is included below and in the classroom training brochure.

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June 3-4, 2014 in Lexington, KY
This class is hosted by Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection, Division of Waste Management in partnership with Kentucky Petroleum Marketers Association (KPMA).

More information is included below and in the classroom training brochure.To register, select the button associated with the location and date of interest.

click to register
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October 29-30, 2014 in Richmond, VA
This class is hosted by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality.
More information is included below and in the classroom training brochure. To register, select the button associated with the location and date of interest.

Course Dates

  • April 1-2, 2014 (Tuesday-Wednesday)
  • June 3-4, 2014 (Tuesday-Wednesday) Click here to Register
  • October 29-30, 2014 (Wednesday-Thursday) Click here to Register

LNAPL Training Part 1: An Improved Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface - State of Science vs. State of Practice

A sound LNAPL understanding is necessary to effectively characterize and assess LNAPL conditions and potential risks, as well as to evaluate potential remedial technologies or alternatives. Unfortunately, many environmental professionals have a faulty understanding of LNAPL conditions based on outdated paradigms. The ITRC LNAPLs Team is providing Internet-based training to improve the general understanding of LNAPLs. Better understanding leads to better decision making. Additionally, this training provides a necessary technical foundation to foster effective use of the ITRC LNAPLs Team Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009).

Part 1 explains how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1 also explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions. Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

Course Dates

  • March 4, 2014 (Tuesday)
  • July 8, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Characterization and Recoverability - Improved Analysis - Do you know where the LNAPL is and can you recover it?

Part 2 addresses LNAPL characterization and site conceptual model development as well as LNAPL recovery evaluation and remedial considerations. Specifically, Part 2 discusses key LNAPL and site data, when and why those data may be important, and how to get those data. Part 2 also discusses how to evaluate LNAPL recoverability.

Course Dates

  • March 6, 2014 (Thursday)
  • July 10, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

LNAPL Training Part 3: Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals

Over the past few decades, a spectrum of LNAPL remedial technologies have developed that range from conventional pumping or hydraulic recovery systems that address the mobile LNAPL fraction, to a variety of innovative, aggressive, and experimental technologies that address the mobile and residual LNAPL fractions, as well as volatile and soluble LNAPL fractions. Thus, many different LNAPL remedial technologies with differing site and LNAPL applicabilities and capabilities are available to remediate LNAPL releases. This can make selection of a remedial technology daunting and inefficient. To foster informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application, the LNAPLs Team developed the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009). This document addresses seventeen LNAPL remedial technologies and provides a framework to streamline remedial technology evaluation and selection.

Part 3 uses the LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) approach to identify the LNAPL concerns or risks and set proper LNAPL remedial objectives and technology-specific remediation goals and performance metrics. The training course also provides an overview of the LNAPL remedial technology selection framework. The framework uses a series of tools to screen the seventeen remedial technologies addressed in the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (LNAPL-2, 2009) based on site and LNAPL conditions and other important factors.

LNAPL Training Part 1 and LNAPL Training 2 are recommended pre-requisites for this Part 3 training course.

Course Dates

  • March 11, 2014 (Tuesday)
  • July 15, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Mass Flux and Mass Discharge

ITRC offers 1 training course on Mass Flux and Mass Discharge:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge

Most decisions at groundwater contamination sites are driven by measurements of contaminant concentration -- snapshots of contaminant concentrations that may appear to be relatively stable or show notable changes over time. Decisions can be improved by considering mass flux and mass discharge. Mass flux and mass discharge quantify the source or plume strength at a given time and location resulting in better-informed management decisions regarding site prioritization or remedial design as well as leading to significant improvements in remediation efficiency and faster cleanup times. The use of mass flux and mass discharge is increasing and will accelerate as field methods improve and practitioners and regulators become familiar with its application, advantages, and limitations. The decision to collect and evaluate mass flux data is site-specific. It should consider the reliability of other available data, the uncertainty associated with mass flux measurements, the specific applications of the mass flux data, and the cost-benefit of collecting mass measurements.

The ITRC technology overview, Use and Measurement of Mass Flux and Mass Discharge (MASSFLUX-1, 2010), and associated Internet-based training provide a description of the underlying concepts, potential applications, description of methods for measuring and calculating, and case studies of the uses of mass flux and mass discharge. This technology overview and associated Internet-based training are intended to foster the appropriate understanding and application of mass flux and mass discharge estimates and provide examples of use and analysis. The document and training assume the participant has a general understanding of hydrogeology, the movement of chemicals in porous media, remediation technologies, and the overall remedial process. Practitioners, regulators, and others working on groundwater sites should attend this training course to learn more about various methods and potential use of mass flux and mass discharge information.

Course Dates

  • January 9, 2014 (Thursday)
  • June 10, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Metals

ITRC offers 1 training course on Metals:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Attenuation Processes for Metals & Radionuclides

Sites contaminated with metals and radionuclides present unique challenges to the development of effective remedial alternatives that also provide long-term protection to human health and the environment. The high costs of ongoing conventional treatment, total removal, and/or management combined with the scale of potential health and environmental risks make it important to evaluate attenuation-based remedial alternatives. Sites that have been identified as having metal and/or radionuclide contamination include federal facilities, industrial (e.g., mines) sites, disposal sites, and transportation corridors. Common metals include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, copper, and selenium. For radioactive hazardous substances, uranium, radium, strontium, technetium, tritium, and thorium are the most common contaminants of concern. The attenuation processes affect most metals and radionuclides by changing their valence state, which in turn affects their solubility and therefore mobility. When properly employed, Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is an effective knowledge-based remedy where a thorough engineering analysis informs the understanding, monitoring, predicting, and documenting of natural processes. In order to properly employ this remedy, there needs to be a strong scientific basis supported by appropriate research and site-specific monitoring implemented in accordance with quality systems.

This training and the associated ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, A Decision Framework for Applying Monitored Natural Attenuation Processes to Metals and Radionuclides in Groundwater (APMR-1, 2010), are intended for anyone involved with evaluating, investigating, remediating, or managing a site that involves metal and radionuclide contaminants in groundwater. This training and document provide:

  • Introduction to key attenuation processes for metals and radionuclides
  • Information on incorporating MNA into remedial alternatives for metals/rads
  • Overview of the decision framework on MNA for metals and radionuclides in groundwater within the larger evaluation framework of a contaminated site

Course Dates

Mining Waste

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Mining Waste:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Biochemical Reactors for Treating Mining-Influenced Water

Mining influenced water (MIW) includes aqueous wastes generated by ore extraction and processing, as well as mine drainage and tailings runoff. MIW handling, storage, and disposal is a major environmental problem in mining districts throughout the U.S and around the world. Biochemical reactors (BCRs) are engineered treatment systems that use an organic substrate to drive microbial and chemical reactions to reduce concentrations of metals, acidity, and sulfate in MIWs. The ITRC Biochemical Reactors for Mining-Influenced Water technology guidance (BCR-1, 2013) and this associated Internet-based training provide an in-depth examination of BCRs; a decision framework to assess the applicability of BCRs; details on testing, designing, constructing and monitoring BCRs; and real world BCR case studies with diverse site conditions and chemical mixtures. At the end of this training, you should be able to complete the following activities:

  • Describe a BCR and how it works
  • Identify when a BCR is applicable to a site
  • Use the ITRC guidance for decision making by applying the decision framework
  • Improve site decision making through understanding of BCR advantages, limitations, reasonable expectations, regulatory and other challenges
  • Navigate the ITRC Biochemical Reactors for Mining-Influenced Water technology guidance (BCR-1, 2013)

For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, decision flow process for determining the applicability of a biochemical reactor. It is also available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/BCR/ITRC-BCRforMIW-DecisionFlow.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Mining-Waste Treatment Technology Selection (MW-1, 2010) and associated Internet-based training that helps regulators, consultants, industry, and stakeholders in selecting an applicable technology, or suite of technologies, which can be used to remediate mining sites.

Course Dates

  • February 6, 2014 (Thursday)
  • May 22, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME Click here to Register
  • September 23, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • December 9, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Mining Waste Treatment Technology Selection

Mining produces millions of tons of waste each year. Contaminants from unreclaimed or unremediated areas have affected millions of acres of land and over 10,000 miles of stream. Historical mining practices and the absence of routine mined-land reclamation, remediation, and restoration have led to legacy sites with significant environmental and human health impacts. New mining operations continue to have severe waste issues that must be addressed during and after the actual mining operation. Conventional remedial solutions are often lengthy, expensive, and unacceptable to the regulated and regulatory communities, as well as to the public.

ITRC’s Mining Waste Team is developing the ITRC web-based Mining Waste Technology Selection site to assist project managers in selecting an applicable technology, or suite of technologies, which can be used to remediate mining waste contaminated sites. Decision trees, through a series of questions, guide users to a set of treatment technologies that may be applicable to that particular site situation. Each technology is described, along with a summary of the applicability, advantages, limitations, performance, stakeholder and regulatory considerations, and lessons learned. Each technology overview links to case studies where the technology has been implemented. In this associated Internet-based training, instructors provide background information then take participants through the decision tree using example sites. Project managers, regulators, site owners, and community stakeholders should attend this training class to learn how to use the ITRC web-based Mining Waste Technology Selection site to identify appropriate technologies, address all impacted media, access case studies, and understand potential regulatory constraints.

Course Dates

  • May 20, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME Click here to Register
  • December 4, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Munitions Response (e.g., UXO)

ITRC offers 5 training courses on Munitions Response (e.g., UXO):

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response Projects

Geophysical systems are used to detect surface and subsurface anomalies (i.e., unexploded ordnance [UXO] and/or discarded military munitions) during geophysical surveys of munitions response sites. These systems are tested, evaluated, and demonstrated by a site-specific geophysical prove-out (GPO). Information collected during the implementation of the prove-out is analyzed and used to select or confirm the selection of a geophysical system that can meet the performance requirements established for the geophysical survey.

This training introduces the purpose and scope of GPOs; provides examples of goals and objectives associated with GPOs; and presents detailed information needed to evaluate the design, construction, implementation, and reporting of GPOs. The course is based on ITRC's Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response Projects (UXO-3, 2004). In addition to the material covered in the training, this document provides additional background information on geophysical surveys for readers who want to review the broader topic of geophysical surveys, equipment, processes, and survey methodology to gain a greater understanding of the context of GPOs in the munitions response process.

Munitions Response Historical Record Review

The proper collection, analysis, and documentation of a historical records review for a munitions response (MR) provide the basis for the MR site investigation and remediation process. Because the historical review is the first step in evaluating hazards resulting from military activities at project sites, national, state, and local interest has increasingly focused on this review. To evaluate the adequacy of the review performed on a project site, regulators must understand the various processes involved in preparing a historical review because historical evaluations can vary greatly from site to site.

This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to Munitions Response Historical Record Review (UXO-2, 2003), created by ITRC's Unexploded Ordnance Team to assist reviewers in assessing the adequacy of an MRHRR review of property potentially impacted by the use of military munitions. The course teaches the purpose, content, and terminology of munitions historical research; provides a uniform technical approach and useful tools for reviewing an MRHRR document independent of regulatory framework or authorities; and communicates state regulator expectations to those initiating, planning, and executing an MRHRR document.

Quality Considerations for Munitions Response Projects

This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to Quality Considerations for Munitions Response Projects (UXO-5, 2008), created by the ITRC's Unexploded Ordnance Team. In this document, quality is defined as “conformance to requirements.” To manage quality, the quality requirements of the project must first be understood. Requirements must be precisely stated and clearly understood by everyone involved. A plan is then put in place to meet those requirements.

The UXO Team emphasizes taking a whole-system approach to designing, planning, and managing a munitions response (MR) project to optimize quality. Whole-system design means optimizing not just parts but the entire system (in this case the MR). Practically speaking, the UXO Team views an MR project as a system made of processes, sub-processes, and tasks. Therefore, a process approach to planning and managing MR projects is recommended.

An MR plan properly developed using the process approach will contain quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) activities that need to be performed.   Through the proper application of a process approach to plan and manage an MR project, the MR project should produce results of verifiable quality with sufficient QA and QC documentation for defensible decision making.

The document concludes with some real-world examples of how QA/QC planning and process control throughout an MR project can affect the results of the MR project, particularly how attention to quality during MR processes can influence follow-on processes and the project's final outcome.

This training course is intended for an intermediate audience and assumes a basic understanding of specialized processes associated with MR projects. Background information on some of the topics can be found in Munitions Response Historical Records Review (UXO-2, 2003), Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response Projects (UXO-3, 2004), Survey of Munitions Response Technologies (UXO-4, 2006) and their associated Internet-based training courses.

Site Investigation and Remediation for Munitions Response Projects

The Department of Defense (DOD) is currently working on an inventory of former ranges with potential for munitions contamination. There are an estimated 2,000 munitions-contaminated sites located in all 50 states and territories that may affect more than 10 million acres. State and tribal regulatory officials and community stakeholders are routinely required to evaluate DOD cleanup strategies with little, if any, environmentally oriented munitions response training or guidance. State regulators are increasingly being charged with oversight responsibility for munitions response cleanup projects on other than operational ranges, such as formerly used defense sites (FUDS) and base realignment and closure (BRAC) sites. In addition, DOD project managers and industry will benefit from a greater understanding of state regulator expectations.

ITRC's Unexploded Ordnance Team has developed this Internet-based training on the site investigation and site remediation process for munitions response sites on nonoperational ranges. This training provides an introduction and overview of the processes, tools, and techniques used in investigation and remediation. These concepts are illustrated using an example munitions response site. During the course of the training, major steps in each process are identified and key regulatory considerations discussed. This training also identifies additional sources for more detailed information on key aspects of investigation and remediation. State regulators and others who need to understand the general processes involved in these critical aspects of the munitions response process will benefit from this training.

Survey of Munitions Response Technologies

This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to Survey of Munitions Response Technologies (UXO-4, 2006), created by the ITRC's Unexploded Ordnance Team in partnership with the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). The document provides an overview of the current status of commercially-available technologies in common usage for munitions response actions, and, where possible, assess and quantify their performance capabilities. The document includes detailed findings from three separate surveys: (1) an assessment of technology implementation prevalence, (2) an evaluation of Geophysical Prove-Out (GPO) characteristics, and (3) an analysis of technology performance based on GPO and standardized test site results. The document also provides background information about technologies used in munitions response actions, as well as information about advanced technologies.

This training course is intended for an intermediate to advanced audience and assumes an understanding of technologies and phases of munitions response. Background information on some of the topics can be found in Munitions Response Historical Records Review (UXO-2, 2003) and Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response Projects (UXO-3, 2004), and their associated Internet-based training courses (described above). This training course focuses on the major take-home conclusions of the Survey of Munitions Response Technologies (UXO-4, 2006) and provides an understanding of the performance capabilities of available technologies under real-world site conditions.

Natural Attenuation

ITRC offers 3 training courses on Natural Attenuation:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Attenuation Processes for Metals & Radionuclides

Sites contaminated with metals and radionuclides present unique challenges to the development of effective remedial alternatives that also provide long-term protection to human health and the environment. The high costs of ongoing conventional treatment, total removal, and/or management combined with the scale of potential health and environmental risks make it important to evaluate attenuation-based remedial alternatives. Sites that have been identified as having metal and/or radionuclide contamination include federal facilities, industrial (e.g., mines) sites, disposal sites, and transportation corridors. Common metals include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, copper, and selenium. For radioactive hazardous substances, uranium, radium, strontium, technetium, tritium, and thorium are the most common contaminants of concern. The attenuation processes affect most metals and radionuclides by changing their valence state, which in turn affects their solubility and therefore mobility. When properly employed, Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is an effective knowledge-based remedy where a thorough engineering analysis informs the understanding, monitoring, predicting, and documenting of natural processes. In order to properly employ this remedy, there needs to be a strong scientific basis supported by appropriate research and site-specific monitoring implemented in accordance with quality systems.

This training and the associated ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document, A Decision Framework for Applying Monitored Natural Attenuation Processes to Metals and Radionuclides in Groundwater (APMR-1, 2010), are intended for anyone involved with evaluating, investigating, remediating, or managing a site that involves metal and radionuclide contaminants in groundwater. This training and document provide:

  • Introduction to key attenuation processes for metals and radionuclides
  • Information on incorporating MNA into remedial alternatives for metals/rads
  • Overview of the decision framework on MNA for metals and radionuclides in groundwater within the larger evaluation framework of a contaminated site

Course Dates

Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater: Case Histories

In this special session of the ITRC Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater: Principles and Practices training course, the training class includes an additional two hours of content with information on historical case analysis of chlorinated volatile organic compound plumes.

The first two hours of this training class provide the Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater: Principles and Practices training course described above.

The second two hours of this training class describe the findings and conclusions from a study of nationwide chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) plumes. It uses a statistical approach and data from multiple sites to evaluate hydrogeologic, biogeochemical, and physiochemical factors affecting the extent and growth behavior of CVOC plumes in groundwater. A number of specific questions of interest to managers of CVOC cleanup were addressed by this study:

  • How often is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) inferred to be present at sites within the CVOC historical data set and what is the relationship of inferred DNAPL presence to the plume length at a given site?
  • How often is evidence of transformation processes in association with the CVOC plumes in the data set and what are the relationships between the indications of transformations and plume length?
  • Do daughter product plumes behave differently compared to parent CVOC plumes?
  • What is the relationship of fuel hydrocarbon co-contamination to CVOC plume behavior?

This study provides the first statistical analysis of data from a relatively large population of CVOC plumes. It demonstrates that broad trends in relationships between plume behavior and key site variables can be determined through the statistical analyses of historical field data from a large number of sites. This finding is important because it demonstrates that: (1) specific hydrogeologic conditions and contaminant release scenarios at individual sites are not so unique that expected overall trends in the data are completely obscured, and (2) useful average values for site variables such as hydraulic conductivity and groundwater velocity can be quantified in most situations. Such information is useful in bounding the uncertainty in CVOC plume behavior that is important in making risk and long-term resource management decisions. The possible application of the CVOC historical case data to individual site plume behavior uncertainty will be discussed and illustrated by examples. Important measurements that are frequently neglected will also be discussed.

Course Dates

Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater: Principles and Practices

This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to ITRC's Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater: Principles and Practices (ISB-3, 1999), created by ITRC's In Situ Bioremediation Team and the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF) Bioremediation Consortium. The manual and presentation are based on RTDF research activities and on experience and knowledge of the participating members. The course provides a framework for thinking about natural attenuation based on science, focusing on the basic information needed to determine and document the conditions necessary for natural processes to be an effective part of remediating chlorinated solvents in groundwater.

Course Dates

Passive Samplers

ITRC offers 1 training course on Passive Samplers:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Passive Samplers - Protocol for Use of Five Passive Samplers

All groundwater samplers or sampling methodologies attempt to collect a well-water sample which is representative of the groundwater adjacent to the well. The ITRC Passive Sampler Team has defined a passive groundwater sampler as one that is able to acquire a sample from a discrete position in a well without active media transport induced by pumping or purge techniques. Passive sampling is synonymous with no-purge sampling and can be used as a substitute or replacement for any current groundwater sampling technology. Passive samplers have been used in every state in the U.S. and in many other countries. Passive samplers are relatively easy to use; eliminate purge-water production (therefore, there is little or no disposal cost); reduce field sampling variability resulting in highly reproducible data; decrease field labor and project management costs for long-term monitoring; allow rapid field sample collection; sample discrete intervals in a well; are practical for use where access is difficult or discretion is desirable; can be deployed in series to provide a vertical contaminant profile; and have virtually no depth limit.

This training supports the understanding and use of the ITRC Protocol for Use of Five Passive Samplers to Sample for a Variety of Contaminants in Groundwater (DSP-5, 2007). The five technologies included in this document include diffusion samplers (Regenerated Cellulose Dialysis Membrane Sampler and Rigid Porous Polyethylene Sampler), equilibrated grab samplers (Snap™ and HydraSleeve™ Sampler), and an accumulation sampler (GORE™ Module). The training starts with information common to all five samples then focuses on each sampler as instructors describe the sampler and explain how it works, discuss deployment and retrieval of the sampler, highlight advantages and limitations, and present results of data comparison studies.

Perchlorate

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Perchlorate:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Perchlorate Remediation Technologies

Perchlorate contamination exists in water and soil and occurs widely throughout the United States. Public awareness and concern regarding perchlorate has increased in recent years. Perchlorate occurrence in drinking water and food supplies is a human health concern because it can interfere with iodide uptake by the thyroid gland and result in decreased thyroid hormone production. The ITRC Perchlorate Team was formed in 2004 to address technical issues associated with perchlorate. Many technologies are available to remediate perchlorate contamination, but only a few are commonly used.

This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to Remediation Technologies for Perchlorate Contamination in Water and Soil (PERC-2, 2008), created by ITRC's Perchlorate Team to assist reviewers in assessing the adequacy of perchlorate remediation projects. This course gives the student a background in the available remediation technologies to treat perchlorate contamination, discusses emerging technologies, and presents case studies of applications.

The first document produced by the ITRC Perchlorate Team, Perchlorate: Overview of Issues, Status, and Remedial Options (PERC-1, 2005) and associated Internet-based training provide regulators and other stakeholders a basic overview of a broad spectrum of information regarding perchlorate sources, sampling and analysis techniques, a discussion of risk issues, risk management strategies and regulatory status, and a brief summary of remediation technologies. It is recommended that the registrant review the Perchlorate: Overview of Issues, Status, and Remedial Options (PERC-1, 2005) document and associated Internet-based training archive for more information.

Perchlorate: Overview of Issues, Status, and Remedial Options

Perchlorate is an inorganic chemical ion consisting of chlorine bonded to four oxygen atoms (ClO4). It occurs both naturally and in manmade compounds. While it was once thought to occur naturally only in one location, ongoing study has found naturally occurring perchlorate in other locations as well. In manmade compounds, it has been manufactured since before the turn of the last century and has been manufactured primarily for use in defense activities and the aerospace industry. Highly soluble and mobile in water, perchlorate is also very stable. Most of the attention focused on perchlorate contamination concerns ground and surface water contamination. However, it can also contaminate soil and vegetation. In general, past management practices did not prevent the release of perchlorate to the environment because it was not recognized or regarded as a contaminant of concern. Improved analytical methodology has increased the known extent of perchlorate contamination in the United States. A variety of remediation technologies are currently commercially available and being used for perchlorate remediation.

This training, based on ITRC's Perchlorate: Overview of Issues, Status, and Remedial Options (PERC-1, September 2005), explains why perchlorate is a hot topic in the environmental community today including up-to-date information on sources, occurrences, toxicity and exposure, regulatory status, and remediation alternatives.

Permeable Reactive Barriers

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Permeable Reactive Barriers:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Permeable Reactive Barriers: Lessons Learned and New Directions

A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a continuous, in situ permeable treatment zone designed to intercept and remediate a contaminant plume. PRBs are often intended as a source-term management remedy or as an on-site containment remedy. The use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the containment and treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants. Reactive media such as carbon sources (compost), limestone, granular activated carbon, zeolites, and others had also been deployed in recent years to treat metals and some organic compounds. Research and deployment of bio-barrier systems is also growing in recent years, particularly for treatment of chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbon constituents.

This training presents updated information regarding new developments, innovative approaches, and lessons learned in the application of PRBs to treat a variety of groundwater contaminants. The information will be presented by reviewing the approaches and results at several sites where PRBs have been deployed. The training is based on the ITRC guidance document titled Permeable Reactive Barriers: Lessons Learned/New Directions (PRB-4, 2005). Case studies from around the country are included in the training to show various designs, contaminants, reactive media, and cost data for PRB systems. The training provides new information on iron-based PRB systems while providing a solid introduction to the non-iron PRBs. As a prerequisite to this course, we ask that you review background information on PRBs as presented in the material from earlier ITRC PRB training courses. You can access archives of these trainings at http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/advprb_032102/ and http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/prb_031902/. Three other documents produced by the ITRC PRB team are also available for review on the ITRC Permeable Reactive Barriers Guidance Documents page.

Permeable Reactive Barriers: Technology Update

A Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) is an in situ permeable treatment zone designed to intercept and remediate a contaminant plume to remediate groundwater. The treatment zone may be created directly using reactive materials such as iron, or indirectly using materials designed to stimulate secondary processes (e.g., adding carbon substrate and nutrients to enhance microbial activity). Since its first implementation in the early 1990s, over 200 PRB systems have been installed to treat groundwater contaminants and PRBs have become an important component among the various technologies available to remediate groundwater contamination.

The ITRC Technical/Regulatory Guidance Permeable Reactive Barrier: Technology Update (PRB-5, 2011) and associated Internet-based training is intended to help guide state and federal regulators, consultants, project managers, and other stakeholders and technology implementers through the decision process when a PRB is being considered as a remedy, or part of a remedy, to address contaminated groundwater; and to provide updated information regarding several technical aspects of the PRB using information attained from the more than 15 years that the PRB has been a viable and accepted in situ remediation technology for contaminated groundwater. The guidance and training provide an update on PRBs to include discussions of additional types of reactive media and contaminants that can be treated, design considerations, construction/installation approaches and technologies, performance assessment, and longevity.

If you are unfamiliar with PRBs, we ask that you review background information on PRBs prior to attending the training class. Documents produced by the ITRC PRB team are available for review on the ITRC Permeable Reactive Barriers Guidance Documents page. You can access archives of previous ITRC trainings at http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/advprb_032102/, http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/prb_031902/, and http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/prbll_061506/.

Course Dates

Phytotechnologies

ITRC offers 1 training course on Phytotechnologies:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Phytotechnologies

Phytotechnologies is a set of technologies using plants to remediate or contain contaminants in soil, groundwater, surface water, or sediments. These technologies have become attractive alternatives to conventional cleanup technologies due to relatively low capital costs and the inherently aesthetic nature of planted sites.

This training familiarizes participants with ITRC’s Phytotechnology Technical and Regulatory Guidance and Decision Trees, Revised (Phyto-3, 2009). This document provides guidance for regulators who evaluate and make informed decisions on phytotechnology work plans and practitioners who have to evaluate any number of remedial alternatives at a given site. This document updates and replaces Phytoremediation Decision Tree (Phyto-1, 1999) and Phytotechnology Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document (Phyto-2, 2001). It has merged the concepts of both documents into a single document. This guidance includes new, and more importantly, practical information on the process and protocol for selecting and applying various phytotechnologies as remedial alternatives.

This guidance contains decision trees:

  1. Remedy Selection Decision Tree
  2. Groundwater Decision Tree
  3. Soil/Sediment Decision Tree
  4. Riparian Zone Decision Tree

This course will be most useful to you if you download the guidance and follow the discussion with the Decision Trees displayed in your guidance. Our instruction is how to use the Guidance – not how to use the decision trees process. The decision trees process is explained within the Guidance.

Course Dates

Radionuclides

ITRC offers 4 training courses on Radionuclides:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Decontamination and Decommissioning of Radiologically-Contaminated Facilities

The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of radiologically-contaminated facilities presents numerous challenges. Many tasks are involved, each of which requires adherence to a complex array of federal and state regulations and policies, attention to health and safety issues for workers and the public, monitoring and management of schedules and costs, and interaction with a potentially large number of stakeholders who have an interest in the present activities and future plans for sites undergoing D&D. Since large-scale D&D operations at nuclear facilities began in the 1970s, one of the most noticeable advances has been dramatic decreases in decommissioning cost. This change is the result of a combination of accumulated decommissioning operational experience reducing the high initial cost estimates (which were high due to uncertainties and poorly defined boundaries), evolution of regulatory guidance, and continuously-developing technologies.

A large body of knowledge has already been accumulated on D&D operations. At the present time, approximately 90 commercial power reactors, 250 research reactors, 100 mines, 5 reprocessing facilities, and 14 fuel fabrication plants have been retired from operation, with some having been fully dismantled. In addition, the largest environmental cleanup projects ever undertaken are in progress or have recently been completed at several large DOE facilities in the nuclear weapons complex. Technologies developed for the D&D portions of these cleanups are part of the lessons learned from these projects.

This training introduces regulators, cleanup contractors, site owners/operators, and technology providers to ITRC's Technical/Regulatory Guidance, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Radiologically-Contaminated Facilities (RAD-5, 2008), created by ITRC's Radionuclides Team. The curriculum is composed of four modules as follows:

  • Module 1: Introduction and Regulatory Basis for D&D
  • Module 2: Factors for Implementing D&D
  • Module 3: Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) Calculators
  • Module 4: Case Studies and Lessons Learned

Radiation Risk Assessment - Updates and Tools

The ITRC Radionuclides Team's Determining Cleanup Levels at Radioactively Contaminated Sites: Case Studies (RAD-2, 2002) examines the factors influencing variations in cleanup level development at various radioactively contaminated sites and underscores the need for training to enhance consistency in radiation risk assessment application. The document also acknowledges the differences between the 'dose approach' used at some sites and EPA's 'risk-based approach.' Since most radioactively contaminated DOE and DOD sites are developing cleanup goals under CERCLA authority, there is a need for training that clarifies the variations between these approaches and elaborates on the methodology used to develop risk-based remediation goals. This training course has been collaboratively developed by the ITRC Radionuclides Team and EPA's Superfund Office to meet these needs. The focus of this training is EPA's new radiation risk assessment tools, which can facilitate better decision making for accelerated cleanups. Course modules have the following specific purposes:

  • Regulatory Background and Case Studies: Provide an overview of the regulatory requirements for cleanup of radioactive waste
  • Existing Practices in Radiation Risk Assessment: Clarify differences between existing radiation risk assessment practices (dose- and risk-based approaches) and provide updates
  • Use of Radiation PRG Calculator: Explain how to use EPA's new risk-based PRG and ARAR dose calculators for radionuclides
  • Case Study Application for PRG Calculator: Demonstrate site-specific challenges in application of tools

Radiation Site Cleanup - CERCLA Requirements and Guidance

The ITRC Radionuclides Team's Determining Cleanup Goals at Radioactively Contaminated Sites: Case Studies (RAD-2, April 2002) examines the factors influencing variations in cleanup level development at various radioactively contaminated sites and underscores the need for training to enhance consistency in remedy selection for radiological contaminants. Since most radioactively contaminated DOE and DOD sites are developing cleanup goals under CERCLA authority, there is a need for training that elaborates on the methodology used to select remedies under EPA's approach for CERCLA sites.

This training course has been collaboratively developed by the ITRC Radionuclides Team and EPA's Superfund Office to meet these needs. Its focus is EPA's guidance for remediating radioactively contaminated sites, which can facilitate cleanups that are consistent with the way chemical contaminants are addressed, except where technical differences posed by radiation are addressed. In addition to cleanup and its associated guidance, this course introduces the participants to long-term stewardship (LTS) challenges related to large radioactively contaminated sites. This understanding of LTS issues is integral to the cleanup process and decisions made at the radiation sites. Course modules have the following specific purposes:

  • Module 1 - Radiation Regulatory Background and Case Studies: Provide an overview of the regulatory requirements for cleanup of radioactive waste
  • Modules 2 & 3 - EPA CERCLA Radiation Requirements and Guidance: Explain EPA remedy selection policy, in particular those guidance documents and tools that address radioactively contaminated sites
  • Module 4 - Beyond Cleanup: Challenges of Long-Term Management of Radiation Sites: This module focuses on the challenges of long-term stewardship of large radiation sites identified by the ITRC Radionuclides Team in their document Issues of Long-Term Stewardship: State Regulators' Perspective (RAD-3, July 2004)

Real-Time Measurement of Radionuclides in Soil

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sites and some Superfund and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) sites are contaminated with radionuclides. Radioactive contamination is also an issue potentially faced by Homeland Security. Characterization of radionuclides is an expensive and time-consuming process. Using real-time technologies to complete initial screening and characterization of radionuclide contamination results in more timely and cost-effective characterizations. Real-time technologies can also direct excavation resulting in more timely and cost-effective cleanups. The result is earlier protection of human health and the environment.

This training introduces state regulators, environmental consultants, site owners, and community stakeholders to ITRC's Technology Overview document Real-Time Measurement of Radionuclides in Soil: Technology and Case Studies (RAD-4, 2006), created by ITRC's Radionuclides Team. This training provides information on the basics of real-time measurement systems (detector types and platforms, location control and mapping technologies, surface and subsurface applications and limitations), how the technologies and data are used (characterization, remediation and closure, decision support, sources and types of uncertainty), acceptance issues (QA/QC, decision framework, uncertainty), and case studies. The purpose is to provide a solid background understanding of the technology itself and the context within which it is used.

Remediation Process Optimization

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Remediation Process Optimization:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Performance-Based Environmental Management

Performance-based environmental management (PBEM) is a strategic, goal-oriented methodology that is implemented through effective planning and decision logic to reach a desired end state of site cleanup. The goal of PBEM is to be protective of human health and the environment while efficiently implementing appropriate streamlined cleanup processes. The major components of PBEM include: systematic planning, effective communications, agreement of a land use risk strategy, current conceptual site model, decision logic analysis, remediation process optimization (RPO), ARAR analysis, exit strategy development, and performance-based contracting including environmental insurance.

This ITRC training presents an overview of what PBEM is, explains how and when to implement it, and describes the issues that regulators are concerned about throughout PBEM's implementation. Case studies will be presented to illustrate successful PBEM projects. The course is valuable not only because PBEM is being proposed and implemented at many federal and private sites throughout the country but also because PBEM provides an opportunity to enhance all site remediation.

This training is geared to those in the environmental remediation field including federal, state, and local government officials; owners or operators of sites; and consultants. The course will be most beneficial if the participant has taken one of ITRC's remediation process optimization courses. Online archives are available for What is Remediation Process Optimization and How Can It Help Me Identify Opportunities for Enhanced and More Efficient Site Remediation? and for Remediation Process Optimization - Advanced Training. These courses are recommended as pre-requisites, but are not required. The training materials are based on the ITRC RPO Team's Technical Regulatory Guidance Document: Improving Environmental Site Remediation through Performance-Based Environmental Management (RPO-7, 2007).

Remediation Process Optimization - Advanced Training

Remediation Process Optimization (RPO) is the systematic evaluation and enhancement of site remediation to ensure that human health and the environment are being protected over the long term at minimum risk and cost. Successful remediation managers understand not only technologies to be deployed at sites but also the underlying technical basis that supports the decision-making process. An understanding of these management methods and techniques taken together will serve as an excellent resource for moving forward on RPO projects.

The purpose of this ITRC training is to present an overview of the material covered in five technical fact sheets that ITRC's RPO Team produced to enhance site remediation optimization and decision-making. The training modules provide additional information and techniques to improve project schedules, effectively manage resources, emphasize risk, and discuss tools to efficiently clean up contaminated sites. The ITRC RPO Fact Sheets (RPO-2 through 6, 2006) provide detailed information on the following topics:

  • Life-cycle Cost Analysis
  • Exit Strategy – Seeing the Forest Beyond the Trees
  • Above Ground Treatment Technologies
  • Data Management, Analysis, and Visualization Techniques
  • Performance-Based Management (PBM)

These fact sheets were developed following the feedback to the RPO team's Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document Remediation Process Optimization: Identifying Opportunities for Enhanced and More Efficient Site Remediation (RPO-1, September 2004) and training, "What is Remediation Process Optimization and How Can It Help Me Identify Opportunities for Enhanced and More Efficient Site Remediation?" (training archive available at http://www.clu-in.org/conf/itrc/rpo_092804/). The document and training archive are recommended as prerequisites for this RPO advanced Internet-based training course.

Remediation Risk Management

ITRC offers 1 training course on Remediation Risk Management:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Project Risk Management

Remediation Risk Management (RRM) is a course of action through which all risks related to the remediation processes (site investigations, remedy selection, execution, and completion) are holistically addressed in order to maximize the certainty in the cleanup process to protect human health and the environment. Remediation decisions to achieve such a goal should be made based on threshold criteria on human health and ecological risks, while considering all the other potential project risks. Through this training course and associated ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document: Project Risk Management for Site Remediation (RRM-1, 2011), the ITRC RRM team presents tools and processes that can help the site remediation practitioner anticipate, plan for, and mitigate many of the most common obstacles to a successful site remediation project. Examples of project risks include remediation technology feasibility risks; remedy selection risks; remedy construction, operation and monitoring risks; remedy performance and operations risks; environmental impacts of systems during their operation; worker safety risk, human health and ecological impacts due to remedy operation; as well as costs and schedules risks including funding and contracting issues. You should learn: the principles and elements of Remediation Risk Management (RRM); the importance and benefits of RRM; how to implement RRM based on a discussion of case studies: how RRM can help you achieve more successful remediation; and how to use the ITRC RRM information to your benefit.

Course Dates

  • January 14, 2014 (Tuesday)
  • November 13, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Risk Assessment

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Risk Assessment:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Determination and Application of Risk-Based Values

Assessment of human health risks posed by exposure to hazardous substances is a vital component to the process of remediation of contaminated sites. Risk-based screening values are developed and used in both planning and conducting site remediation. This training course is designed for site managers and others involved in making remedial decisions to help them better understand the risk assessment / risk management process. This training course describes the development and application of risk-based screening values. The first module provides a review of key risk assessment concepts related to risk management. It also introduces the Electronic Risk Resource Sheet developed by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. The second module focuses on the process by which risk-based levels are derived in different states. This module introduces the document, Examination of Risk-Based Screening Values and Approaches of Selected States (RISK-1, 2005), developed by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. The third module examines the application of risk assessment to remediation operations in two case studies providing examples of how risk assessment has actually been implemented, based upon research and case studies conducted by the ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team. This training course describes a number of the reasons behind variations in risk-based screening values and their use in risk management. Overall, the training course enhances the transparency and understanding of risk assessment and its use in remediation.

Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites

The ITRC Risk Assessment Resources team developed a document titled Use of Risk Assessment in Management of Contaminated Sites (RISK-2, 2008). This Internet-based training is taken from the RISK-2 document and highlights variation of risk-based site management and how to improve the use of risk assessment for making better risk management decisions. This training course looks at how various risk-based approaches and criteria are applied in various states and programs throughout the processes of screening, characterization, and management of contaminated sites.

The document and training course are intended for risk assessors and project managers involved with the characterization, remediation, and/or re-use of sites. Together they provide a valuable tool for federal and state regulatory agencies to demonstrate how site data collection, risk assessment, and risk management may be better integrated. This training course explains:

  • Variation in risk assessment parameters/approaches in various states and their influence on risk management
  • Insights into the use of risk assessment in the risk management process through use of specific case study examples
  • An improved process of using risk assessment in risk management

This course builds on the Team's previous work identifying variation in the development of risk-based numerical criteria, specifically soil screening levels. A prerequisite to this training course is the Risk Team's previous Internet-based training (archive is available from http://cluin.org/live/archive.cfm?sort=title#itrc) based on ITRC's Risk Assessment and Risk Management: Determination of Risk-Based Values (RISK-1, 2005). The Electronic Risk Resource Sheet published by the ITRC Risk Team is recommended as an excellent resource for supplemental materials related to risk assessment and risk management.

Course Dates

Sediments

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Sediments:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that approximately 10 percent (over a billion cubic yards) of the sediment underlying our nation's surface water is sufficiently contaminated with pollutants to pose potential risks to fish and to humans and wildlife that eat fish. Based on current average costs for managing contaminated sediments, this volume of material could cost several trillion dollars to dredge. Methods to assess the potential effect of sediment contamination on human or ecological health are historically based on total contaminant concentrations in the bulk sediment. However, research conducted over the past fifteen years has shown that the bioavailability of many of these contaminants to receptors is much less than the total amount of contaminant in the sediment. "Bioavailability processes," as defined by the National Research Council, are the "individual physical, chemical, and biological interactions that determine the exposure of plants and animals to chemicals associated with soils and sediments." Only the bioavailable fraction of an environmental contaminant may be taken up and subsequently result in an effect on an organism. Incorporating bioavailability considerations in the calculation of risk can optimize the extent of cleanup required to be protective, improve site decision-making, and can be an important factor in balancing the risks caused by remedial action with the risks addressed by remedial action.

ITRC's web-based Technical and Regulatory Guidance, Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sites (CS-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training are intended to assist state regulators and practitioners with understanding and incorporating fundamental concepts of bioavailability in contaminated sediment management practices. This guidance and training describe how bioavailability considerations can be used to evaluate exposure at contaminated sediment sites, the mechanisms affecting contaminant bioavailability, available tools used to assess bioavailability, the proper application of those tools, and how bioavailability information can be incorporated into risk-management decisions. This guidance and training also contain summaries of case studies where bioavailability has been assessed and considered in the contaminated sediment remedial decision making process. This guidance and training provide insight on how bioavailability assessments can be used to understand, mitigate, and manage risk at a contaminated sediment site, often at a reduced overall project cost.

The intended users of this guidance and training participants are individuals who have a working knowledge of contaminated sediment management but seek additional information about bioavailability. Prior to the training class, participants are encouraged to review the following documents:

Course Dates

  • July 17, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • October 9, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments

The sediments underlying many of our nation’s major waterways are contaminated with toxic pollutants from past industrial activities. Cleaning up contaminated sediments is expensive and technically-challenging. Sediment sites are unique, complex, and require a multidisciplinary approach and often project managers lack sediments experience. ITRC developed the technical and regulatory guidance, Remedy Selection for Contaminated Sediments (CS-2, 2014), to assist decision-makers in identifying which contaminated sediment management technology is most favorable based on an evaluation of site specific physical, sediment, contaminant, and land and waterway use characteristics. The document provides a remedial selection framework to help identify favorable technologies, and identifies additional factors (feasibility, cost, stakeholder concerns, and others) that need to be considered as part of the remedy selection process. This ITRC training course supports participants with applying the technical and regulatory guidance as a tool to overcome the remedial challenges posed by contaminated sediment sites. Participants learn how to:

  • Identify site-specific characteristics and data needed for site decision making
  • Evaluate potential technologies based on site information
  • Select the most favorable contaminant management technology for their site

For reference during the training class, participants should have a copy of Figure 2-1, Framework for Sediment Remedy Evaluation. It is available as a 1-page PDF at http://www.cluin.org/conf/itrc/rscs/ITRC-SedimentRemedyEvaluation.pdf.

Participants should also be familiar with the ITRC technology and regulatory guidance for Incorporating Bioavailability Considerations into the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediment Sites Website (CS-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training that assists state regulators and practitioners with understanding and incorporating fundamental concepts of bioavailability in contaminated sediment management practices.

Course Dates

  • July 22, 2014 (Tuesday) 2:00 PM - 4:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • October 16, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME
  • December 11, 2014 (Thursday) 11:00 AM - 1:15 PM EASTERN TIME

Small Arms Firing Ranges

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Small Arms Firing Ranges:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Characterization and Remediation of Soils at Closed Small Arms Firing Ranges

Remediation of soils at small arms firing ranges presents unique challenges because contaminants exist both as discrete particles and as sorbed compounds dispersed throughout the soil matrix. The form and distribution of particulate lead varies based on range use, size and impact velocity of the round, soil characteristics, and past range maintenance practices. Removal of the discrete particles during remediation reduces not only total but leachable lead as well. Unfortunately, simple dry screening is seldom suitable to remove lead particles through all size ranges where it is present.

Based on ITRC's Characterization and Remediation of Soils at Closed Small Arms Firing Ranges (SMART-1, 2003), this course introduces participants to the various physical (including hydraulic), chemical, and biochemical mechanisms available to treat or stabilize closed small arms firing ranges, after some unique characterization challenges are overcome.

Environmental Management at Operating Outdoor Small Arms Firing Ranges

Small arms firing ranges are those ranges accepting .50-caliber or smaller nonexploding ammunition. The primary environmental concern is lead; however, there are other associated metals and a few organics to be considered where applicable. Range operators at military, law enforcement, commercial, and private ranges and the appropriate environmental professional who might be hired to manage a range's more complicated environmental issues should attend this Internet-based training on Technical Guideline for Environmental Management at Operating Outdoor Small Arms Ranges (SMART-2, 2005). Government environmental professionals charged with preventing environmental impact and offering technical assistance to the community should also attend this training and refer to the guidance document whenever they encounter small arms range questions. Government environmental professionals are encouraged to use the downloadable version of this training and the associated guidelines as an on-site training tool for range operators in their states and communities.

This training explains how environmental management planning at small arms firing ranges is a method of pollution prevention. The training uses a logic diagram to describe the appropriate steps an environmental professional or range manager should use to establish an operational understanding of a range and the impact it can have on the environment if left unattended. It assists the user to define the environmental characteristics at a range that, left unattended, could potentially impact the environment. It lists the appropriate questions range operators should ask when evaluating the potential for environmental impact. As any potential for impact becomes apparent, the training briefly describes a variety of new and conventional technologies and techniques (i.e., 'best management practices') available to prevent environmental impact on the range. Finally, participants will be able to understand range operations and monitoring that will, when appropriately designed, enable the range to operate cost-effectively without endangering the environment or the shooting enthusiasts, law enforcement officers, the military, or the public.

Solidification/Stabilization

ITRC offers 1 training course on Solidification/Stabilization:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Solidification/Stabilization: Development of Performance Specifications for Solidification/Stabilization

Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) is a remedial technology option which blends treatment reagents into contaminated material to impart physical and/or chemical changes to reduce the flux of contamination that leaches from a contaminant source to within acceptable parameters set forth in a site-specific remediation goal. S/S can be effective for metals, asbestos, radioactive materials, oxidizers, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides and is potentially effective for dioxins/furans, some VOCs and other organics. Although there is abundant literature describing the S/S process and test methods for design and implementation, there was a lack of guidance for assessing performance. The ITRC technical and regulatory guidance document Development of Performance Specifications for Solidification/Stabilization (S/S-1, 2011) and associated Internet-based training provide an approach to assist practitioners and regulators with measuring and determining acceptable S/S performance. This approach developed by the ITRC Solidification/Stabilization Team provides information for developing, testing, and evaluating appropriate site-specific performance specifications and the considerations for designing appropriate long-term stewardship programs. In addition, the approach provides useful tools for establishing an appropriate degree of treatment and regulatory confidence in the performance data to support decision making. This training and guidance is intended to be beneficial to anyone involved with CERCLA, RCRA, brownfields, UST, or any other regulatory program where S/S has been selected or implemented as a remedial technology.

Course Dates

Triad Approach

ITRC offers 1 training course on Triad Approach:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Triad Approach - A New Paradigm for Environmental Project Management

The Triad approach can be thought of as an initiative to update the environmental restoration process by providing a better union of scientific and societal factors involved in the resolution of contamination issues. It does so by emphasizing better investigation preparation (systematic project planning), greater flexibility in field work (dynamic work strategies), and advocacy of real-time measurement technologies, including field-generated data. The central concept that joins all of these ideas is the need to understand and manage uncertainties that affect decision making. The Triad approach relies on technological, scientific, and process advances that offer the potential for improvements in both quality and cost savings. The cost-saving potential is considered to be significant but is only now being documented by case studies.

This ITRC training course introduces the Triad concept and highlights how this process can increase the effectiveness and quality of environmental investigations. Key terms are defined, and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The concepts embodied in the three legs of the Triad approach--systematic project planning, dynamic work strategies, and real-time measurement technologies--are discussed. Some case studies are discussed, including the savings of time and money attributed to using the Triad approach. This training explains the relationship of the Triad to previous regulatory guidance and offers a discussion of issues that may affect stakeholders. An example is given of a state's efforts to formally adopt the Triad approach into its existing regulatory program. The training concludes by directing trainees to additional resources for further study. The ITRC guidance document Technical and Regulatory Guidance for the Triad Approach: A New Paradigm for Environmental Project Management (SCM-1, 2003) developed by the ITRC Sampling, Characterization, and Monitoring Team, serves as the basis for this training course.

Vapor Intrusion

ITRC offers 1 training course on Vapor Intrusion:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Vapor Intrusion Pathway: A Practical Guideline

Vapor Intrusion is the migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings. Volatile chemicals may include volatile organic compounds, select semi-volatile organic compounds, and some inorganic analytes, such as elemental mercury and hydrogen sulfide. Degradation of the indoor air quality causes a great deal of fear and anxiety among building occupants, business, and other property owners. Vapor intrusion has become a significant environmental issue for regulators, industry leaders, and concerned residents. Vapor intrusion requires three components: the source, an inhabited building, and a pathway from the source to the inhabitants.

The ITRC Vapor Intrusion Team was composed of representatives from 19 state environmental agencies, 12 environmental companies, and four federal agencies (including EPA). This team developed the ITRC Technical and Regulatory Guidance document Vapor Intrusion Pathway: A Practical Guideline (VI-1, 2007), companion document Vapor Intrusion Pathway: Investigative Approaches for Typical Scenarios (VI-1A, 2007), and this Internet-based training course to be used by regulatory agencies and practitioners alike. This Internet-based training course provides an overview of the vapor intrusion pathway; summarizes introductory information on the framework (evaluation process), investigative tools, and mitigation approaches; and utilizes typical scenarios to illustrate the process.

Wetlands

ITRC offers 2 training courses on Wetlands:

Internet-Based Training

More details are provided below.

Constructed Treatment Wetlands

Natural wetlands have been called 'nature's kidneys' because of their ability to remove contaminants from the water flowing through them. Wetlands are perhaps second only to tropical rain forests in biological productivity; plants grow densely, and there is a rich microbial community in the sediment and soil in part supported by the plant roots.

Constructed treatment wetlands are manmade wetlands developed specifically to treat contaminants typically in water that flows through them. They are constructed to recreate, to the extent possible, the structure and function of natural wetlands. Like other phytoremediation approaches, treatment wetlands are self-sustaining (though sometimes optimized with minimal energy input), making them a very attractive option for water treatment compared to conventional treatment systems, especially when lifetime costs are compared.

Based on Technical and Regulatory Guidance Document for Constructed Treatment Wetlands  (WTLND-1, 2003), this course describes the physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms operating in wetlands treatment systems; the contaminants to which they apply; the characteristics of sites suitable to treatment in this fashion; and relevant regulatory issues.

Mitigation Wetlands - Guidance for Characterization, Design, Construction, and Monitoring of Mitigation Wetlands

Once regarded as wastelands, wetlands are now considered a valuable ecosystem. By the 1980s as much as 50% of the original wetlands resources in the United States had been lost and were disappearing at a rate of approximately 300,000 to 400,000 acres per year. Wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world. Species of microbes, plants, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds, fish, and mammals are part of wetland ecosystems. Physical and chemical features such as climate, topology, geology, and the movement and abundance of water help determine the plant and animal varieties that inhabit each wetland.

Mitigation (Restoration) wetlands are built to offset wetlands losses due to development or degradation. They are designed to return wetlands from a disturbed or altered condition to the previously existing condition or create new wetlands to compensate for the loss. Recent reports have highlighted the high failure rate of mitigation wetlands, with only 30%-50% of all projects considered successful. To improve the success of wetland mitigation projects, this training presents comprehensive guidance for regulators, environmental professionals, or owners to use to understand, characterize, design, construct, and monitor mitigation wetlands. The course is based on Characterization, Design, Construction, and Monitoring of Mitigation Wetlands (WTLND-2, 2005) by the ITRC Mitigation Wetlands Team.

Internet-Based Training Archives

Archives of over 50 previous ITRC Internet-based training events are available anytime you want to view and hear a previous offering of the ITRC course. The training courses are listed alphabetically by training title at http://cluin.org/live/archive.cfm?sort=title#itrc

Customer Quotes

I’ve been looking for 20 years for a LNAPL class like this one. It’s a great class.

-- James Fitting, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Hartford, CT

ITRC Guidelines to Use ITRC Materials

Click here to access ITRC's Usage Policy which provides guidelines for using and referencing ITRC documents and presentations.